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Report: Lewisville Lake not shark-infested, but ‘Jaws’ is a good 4th of July movie

The photo was from August 2013 in Maryland, where fishermen actually did catch two bull sharks near the mouth of the Potomac River.
The photo was from August 2013 in Maryland, where fishermen actually did catch two bull sharks near the mouth of the Potomac River. WFAA.com

Fake News was debunked Saturday. Not only in North Texas, but in Kansas.

The North Texas story on Facebook said that an angler, Ima Lion, 62 — (Ima Lion was the best they could do?) “caught a fresh water shark in Lewisville Lake.”

And then a photo showed a little girl posing with the shark.

WFAA.com and other Dallas-Fort Worth television stations carried the tweet of a Texas game warden.

The photo and girl were legit, WFAA.com reported, from August 2013 in Maryland when two fishermen actually caught a bull shark near the mouth of the Potomac River.

WFAA found who the girl in the photo was.

The same Facebook photo and fake news were perpetrated upon Glen Elder Reservoir, a lake about 165 miles north of Wichita, The Kansas City Star reported Saturday.

Doug Nygren, fisheries chief for Kansas Wildlife and Parks, told The Kansas City Star, “Only the bull shark can live in fresh water, and they sometimes do swim up into rivers.

“Most other sharks couldn’t survive in fresh water. One reason is they’d sink to the bottom. Their buoyancy would be bad in fresh water.”

The Kansas City Star also reported that several sources online, including In-Fisherman, said bull sharks have traveled up the Mississippi River.

What to make of it? The long Fourth of July holiday weekend is a great time to watch the 1975 blockbuster “Jaws,” when the mayor of a New England summer resort town orders beaches be reopened for the Fourth of July weekend to tragic consequences.

And Shark Week is July 23.

No matter what, you’re gonna need a bigger boat.

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