Arlington Citizen-Journal

Arlington school district gets $200,000 grant for Emerging Leaders

The Arlington school district’s Emerging Leaders Program for campus administrators has been thrown some love by the Sid W. Richardson Foundation.
The Arlington school district’s Emerging Leaders Program for campus administrators has been thrown some love by the Sid W. Richardson Foundation. Arlington school district

The Arlington school district’s Emerging Leaders program for campus administrators has been thrown some love by the Sid W. Richardson Foundation.

The program, which began in 2014 and which the district describes as a “research-based principal and assistant principal training program,” is the recipient of a $200,000 grant from the Fort Worth-based foundation.

In partnership with the national nonprofit New Leaders, Emerging Leaders includes a summer induction session, monthly in-person meetings, one-on-one coaching and ongoing webinars that help develop aspiring school leaders. The idea, according to the district, is “to promote increased student outcomes.”

It’s also designed to have potential campus leaders at the ready when turnover occurs, said Steven Wurtz, now the district’s chief academic officer, who helped bring the program to Arlington.

“The goal is to establish a pipeline to campus leadership for people who are demonstrating leadership potential,” Wurtz told the Star-Telegram in 2014.

“We are honored to be awarded this grant that will help us continue to provide unique opportunities for leadership development, which is in alignment with the leadership, citizenship and responsibility performance area objectives in the district’s ‘Achieve Today. Excel Tomorrow.’ strategic plan,” Superintendent Marcelo Cavazos said in a statement.

In a statement, Sid Richardson Foundation Chief Executive Officer Pete Geren called the leadership program “important and innovative.”

“Providing a quality education to Texas’ students is critical to the future of our state, and this program helps develop leaders in education,” he said.

Read Next

Initial donors for the program were Raise Your Hand Texas ($1.3 million), the Meadows Foundation ($90,000) and American Express and the National Association of Secondary School Principals ($330,000), the district said.

This report includes material from the Star-Telegram archives.

Patrick M. Walker: 817-390-7423, @patrickmwalker1

  Comments