Arlington Citizen-Journal

Arlington ramps up street repair program through 2020

Street repairs and resurfacing are complete on Chamberland Drive in Arlington in 2014. Some $260.9 million in repair and replacement projects are on the list for the next five years.
Street repairs and resurfacing are complete on Chamberland Drive in Arlington in 2014. Some $260.9 million in repair and replacement projects are on the list for the next five years. Star-Telegram archives

Coming to a street near you — a pothole repair, or maybe a complete reconstruction.

The city, heeding what officials call the No. 1 concern of its residents, is stepping up its attack on rickety road conditions by investing $260.9 million in repair and replacement projects over the next five years.

In fact, when the city signs off on another $20 million in street-work contracts in October, it will have $80 million of construction projects going on simultaneously — the most in Arlington’s history, city officials said.

David Wynn, assistant director of engineering and construction in the Public Works and Transportation Department, said most of the work is driven by the deterioration of many roads built in an aggressive street program in the mid-1980s.

“What we’re seeing now are these streets coming to the end of their useful lives,” he said.

$80 million in street projects planned to be underway in October — the most in Arlington’s history

Mayor Jeff Williams said the city already is aggressively going after potholes with two crews and pothole trucks, which search for pocked streets on their own and respond to pothole sightings reported to the city by residents. To report problems, visit the City Action Center online or call 817-459-6777.

Williams said the hotline number will soon be stenciled onto the pothole trucks.

“We can use help from our citizens,” he said, noting that unrepaired potholes quickly lead to more damage. “If you see a pothole, call in and let us know.”

Speaking at a City Council work session on streets last week, Williams said the city “has all the projects we can under construction without raising the tax rate.”

He urged residents to be patient.

“So anytime you’re held up in traffic due to road construction, know that this is to be a positive thing moving forward,” he said.

If you see a pothole, call in and let us know.

Mayor Jeff Williams

Major funding sources for 2016-20 street projects

▪ Quarter-cent sale tax, approved by voters in 2002 for street maintenance and repair: $88.3 million. (Includes a small amount of general budget funds.)

▪ 2014 bond program for major road projects: $172.6 million. (Includes some federal block grants.)

Bond programs

▪ 2009-2015: total: $242.9 million; annual: $34.7 million

▪ 2016-2020: total: $260.9 million; annual: $52.2 million

Biggest single projects 2016-20 (including costs of design and right of way):

▪ Eden Road, U.S. 287 to Calender Road: $15 million

▪ Matlock Road, Bardin Road to Green Oaks Boulevard: $14.4 million

▪ Turner Warnell, Matlock Road to Cooper Street: $13.7 million

▪ Collins Street, Park Row Drive to Texas 303: $11 million

▪ West Harris Road, Cooper Street to Calender Road: $8.2 million

▪ Avenue E, Texas 360 to Great Southwest Parkway: $8.2 million

For the neighborhoods: $83 million, nearly half of the 2014 bond funds, to reconstruct existing residential and arterial streets that are beyond reasonable repair.

▪ See the Street Condition Map

Robert Cadwallader: 817-390-7186, @Kaddmann_ST

  Comments