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Texan battles 5-foot snake in his commode

Beware toilet snakes if you're fortunate enough to have a rural ranch away from home.
Beware toilet snakes if you're fortunate enough to have a rural ranch away from home. YouTube user William B. Tedrick

It's the stuff of nightmares.

A snake slithers up through the toilet, having gotten itself stuck in the plumbing, and leaves the household in utter panic.

But if you're one of those Texans who has a ranch home away from home, maybe you can avoid the 'panic" part, like Ben Tedrick did.

In a video Tedrick uploaded to YouTube on Tuesday, Tedrick offers a master class in dealing with toilet snakes as part of his "Life on the Ranch" series. The video shows Tedrick successfully pulling a Texas rat snake from his ranch home toilet and freeing it in the nearby woods.

His ranch is in rural Brazos County, according to the Bryan-College Station Eagle, where Tedrick works as a technology manager, according to his LinkedIn profile.

"We were cleaning up the big house on the ranch that set vacant for a few years, and then this happened," the intro text to the 6-plus minute video that chronicles his commode battle with the flat-bellied beast reads.

Upon noticing the snake coming up above the surface of the toilet water, Tedrick fashioned a snake-nabbing-device from a mop handle and some string, and told the Eagle that he "just waited for its head to come out."

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Man, 1. Snake, 0. YouTube screenshot YouTube user William B. Tedrick

From there, Tedrick had quite a tussle with the 5-footer.

"I was impressed," Tedrick told the newspaper. "I had him out about three feet when he coiled up again, and he pulled me forward. I was afraid his head was going to pop off, but he was perfectly OK."

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Why humans are above snakes in the food chain. YouTube screenshot YouTube user William B. Tedrick

The Texas rat snake is "one of the most commonly encountered species of non-venomous snake in North Texas," according to the UT Arlington biology department, and they are "capable of growing more than 77 inches (2 meters) in body length."

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