BBQ

Farewell to a BBQ stand: A North Richland Hills favorite will close after 10 years

Blowtorched BBQ: It’s a thing in Texas

Barrett Black of The Original Black's Barbecue in Lockhart, had a blowtorch station set up next to his brisket serving station at the Fort Worth Food + Wine Festival's BBQ Showdown on Thursday night. There he served up a Jalapeno, Cheddar and Mapl
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Barrett Black of The Original Black's Barbecue in Lockhart, had a blowtorch station set up next to his brisket serving station at the Fort Worth Food + Wine Festival's BBQ Showdown on Thursday night. There he served up a Jalapeno, Cheddar and Mapl

A nine-year barbecue restaurant will close Saturday, but the owner is choosing greener pastures,

Owner Greg Holbrook of Poor Daddy’s Smokehouse on Texas 26 wrote on Facebook that he will move to West Texas to serve oilfield crews, following a path of several DFW pitmasters and cooks in recent years.

Poor Daddy’s posted on Facebook: “Please come by and say goodbye and enjoy some of our great hickory-smoked barbecue one last time. We look forward to our new chapter and will keep everyone posted once it becomes official.”

Holbrook responded to a commenter: “With the family’s work in the oilfield going on out west we are moving to Kermit.”

Holbrook, also a college baseball umpire and youth sports sponsor, opened Poor Daddy’s in 2009 in a former Long John Silver’s that had been Hammer’s Bar-B-Q.

In a 2013 DFW.com review, Poor Daddy’s was praised for the “best barbecue beans” and a “solid” brisket.

Poor Daddy’s led Yelp barbecue ratings in North Richland Hills, ahead of Back Forty (on Davis Boulevard) and a new location of the Royse City-based Soulman’s chain.

According to the Facebook page, Poor Daddy’s will be open until Saturday at 7509 Boulevard 26; 817-281-9100, poordaddys.com.

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Columnist Bud Kennedy is a Fort Worth guy who covered high school football at 16 and has moved on to two Super Bowls, seven political conventions and 15 Texas Legislature sessions. Since 1985, he has also written more than 2,000 “Eats Beat” columns about Texas dining, restaurants and food.

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