Nightlife

It’s about to be game over for Barcadia Fort Worth, but don’t count a replay out yet

Kids of all ages hang out at Barcadia in Fort Worth, Texas on Friday, January 1, 2016. The bar offers vintage arcade games from skee ball to Ms. Pac-Man. Special/Lawrence Jenkins
Kids of all ages hang out at Barcadia in Fort Worth, Texas on Friday, January 1, 2016. The bar offers vintage arcade games from skee ball to Ms. Pac-Man. Special/Lawrence Jenkins Star-Telegram archives

Barcadia, the bar/restaurant/retro-arcade, is about to become the latest casualty in So7, the small restaurant-retail complex just off West 7th Street near Trinity Park in Fort Worth.

Kala Morgan, the general manager of Barcadia Fort Worth, confirms that it will close after service Dec. 9. The Fort Worth spot, which had been open since 2011, will throw a going-away party for itself and is encouraging people to drop by starting at noon.

“Sadly, we were in the wrong spot, in no man’s land,” Morgan says in a Facebook message. “When we signed on to build Barcadia, we were told that the So7 area was going to be the next ‘entertainment destination,’ which obviously never panned out.”

The entertainment destination turned out to be a few blocks to the west, with numerous bars and restaurants both in Crockett Row at West 7th and in surrounding blocks in the West 7th area around Crockett Row. Add to that increased competiton across the street at LeftBank, home to locations of Hopdoddy Burger Bar and Snooze: An AM Eatery, although even the relatively new LeftBank has already seen at least one restaurant close.

“Unfortunately, Fort Worth’s drinking culture is a fickle little beast,” Morgan says. “Oversaturation of new bars with similar concepts ultimately led to the decision to close the doors.”

Barcadia, which will still have locations in Dallas, New Orleans and Baton Rouge, has a menu of apps, sandwiches, salads and a handful of bar-food entrees, as well as an extensive beer menu, and sangria and cocktails. But the big draw was the games, from familiar bar games such as Jenga to classic arcade games such as Frogger, Galaga and Ms. Pac-Man.

Morgan says that Barcadia is not giving up on Fort Worth yet. “This is not the end for us,” she says. “Stay tuned for updates, as we possibly have something in the works.”

The Fort Worth location of Max’s Wine Dive, which was next door to Barcadia in So7, closed in early September. Mudsmith, a Dallas-based coffee bar that is related to Barcadia, closed its Fort Worth location in So7 months ago.

Chuy’s and Pho District remain open in So7, and a location of Asian-Hispanic fusion chain Zero Degrees, which has been known to have out-the-door lines at its Arlington locations, has been in the works and “coming soon” for months.

Barcadia Fort Worth is at 816 Matisse Drive in Fort Worth. It’s open 4 a.m.-2 p.m. Thursday, 3 p.m.-2 a.m. Friday, noon-2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For updates, follow @barcadia.ftworth on Facebook.

Calvin Shelby, the owner of The Craftcade Pinball Bar in Fort Worth, and general manager/bartender John Cocke talk about their pinball-arcade-meets-cocktail bar concept. The bar is in a former bookstore at 615 S. Jennings Ave. in Fort Worth.

Robert Philpot has been a features reporter for the Star-Telegram since October 1992, and currently covers the Tarrant County (and sometimes more) restaurant scene. He also writes general-entertainment stories and features about DFW TV and radio personalities.
  Comments