College notes: Southern Mississippi to hire Oklahoma State's Monken

12/10/2012 10:30 PM

12/10/2012 10:43 PM

Oklahoma State offensive coordinator Todd Monken will be selected the new head football coach today at Southern Mississippi, The Oklahoman reported Monday.

It is the second time in five years the Golden Eagles have selected a Cowboys offensive coordinator for their head coaching job.

Larry Fedora left Oklahoma State after the 2007 season for Southern Miss. Fedora left there after the 2011 season for the head coaching job at North Carolina.

When Fedora left for the Tar Heels job, Southern Miss interviewed Monken for the vacant post, but ultimately selected Ellis Johnson. When the Golden Eagles went winless this season, Johnson was fired.

The Oklahoman, citing sources, said Monken will not be with Oklahoma State when it plays in the Heart of Dallas Bowl on Jan. 1.

Head coach Mike Gundy calls OSU's plays during games, but has not been involved in game planning since after the 2009 season, The Oklahoman said. Monken has been offensive coordinator the past two seasons.

Petrino to WKU

Bobby Petrino was introduced Monday as Western Kentucky's new head football coach.

The 51-year-old was fired by Arkansas in April for a "pattern of misleading" behavior following an accident in which the coach was injured while riding a motorcycle with his mistress as a passenger.

"At this point in my career, it's about getting back and coaching players," Petrino said. "It just happened to open up at a place we love."

Petrino had a 34-17 record at Arkansas before he was dismissed in the wake of the scandal. Petrino had an affair with former Razorbacks volleyball player Jessica Dorrell, who he later hired as a football assistant and gave $20,000 in gifts.

In other coaching news:

UTEP hired Sean Kugler as its new coach, bringing in a former Miners' player and coach to replace the retired Mike Price.

Kugler spent almost three years as the Pittsburgh Steelers' offensive line coach, following stints with the Buffalo Bills and Detroit Lions. He also worked at Boise State.

He played for current UTEP athletic director Bob Stull, graduating in 1988, and later coached at the school for eight seasons.

Texas Tech said offensive line coach Chris Thomsen will serve as interim coach of the Red Raiders for their bowl game this month against Minnesota. Thomsen was selected Monday, two days after Tommy Tuberville left to take the head coaching position at Cincinnati.

Mike MacIntyre signed a five-year deal to take over as coach at Colorado. MacIntyre guided San Jose State to a 10-2 record this season.

Lattimore declares

Injured South Carolina running back Marcus Lattimore will enter the NFL Draft, according to people familiar with the decision.

One person said that Lattimore is expected to announce his decision later this week. The junior suffered a horrific injury to his right knee against Tennessee on Oct. 27.

Lattimore ends his South Carolina career sixth on the school's rushing list with 2,677 yards and had 11 games with at least 100 yards.

All-Big Ten defensive tackle Johnathan Hankins said he will give up his senior season at Ohio State to make himself available for the 2013 NFL Draft. Hankins, 6-foot-3 and 322 pounds, ends his Buckeyes career with 138 tackles, including 16.5 for losses and five sacks.

Aggies honored

Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel and several of his award-winning Texas A&M teammates will be honored at a "Celebrating the 12th Man" ceremony at 5 p.m. Wednesday at the Leadership Entrance of the Memorial Student Center at A&M.

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