Texas vs. Texas A&M: The last chapter is about to close

One of the longest rivalries in college football history will likely come to an end Thursday

11/22/2011 11:31 PM

11/23/2011 5:48 AM

Texas and Texas A&M meet for the 118th time Thursday night in College Station, and it might be their last meeting. Texas A&M is leaving for the Southeastern Conference next season, and the schools have scheduled no future nonconference games against each other. Only two other rivalries in the FBS have featured more games than Texas-Texas A&M. A look at notable moments in the history of the rivalry, which Texas leads 75-37-5.

1894

at Texas 38,

Texas A&M 0

The rivalry began when Texas needed a practice game before opening its second season of football against Tulane. W.O. Stephens, a Longhorns player, went to College Station to help organize a team at A&M. After a 14-6 warm-up game victory against Galveston High School, A&M traveled to Austin for its second and final game of the season.

1898

at Texas 48, Texas A&M 0

1899

Texas 6,

Texas A&M 0

(at San Antonio)

The teams' first neutral-site meeting -- in San Antonio -- ended 28 minutes early when with Texas leading 6-0, according to The Aggies and the 'Horns: 86 Years of Bad Blood and Good Football, a disputed fumble call went the Longhorns' way and A&M players left the field.

1900

Texas 5, Texas A&M 0

(at San Antonio)

1900

at Texas 11,

Texas A&M 0

The teams' second meeting of 1900 was the first to be played on Thanksgiving Day.

1901

Texas 17, Texas A&M 0

(at San Antonio)

1901

at Texas 32, Texas A&M 0

1902

Texas 0, Texas A&M 0

(at San Antonio)

1902

Texas A&M 12,

at Texas 0

After tying Texas a month earlier to end the Longhorns' seven-game winning streak to start the series, A&M earned its first victory against Texas after sending a "scout" to watch Texas' previous game. A&M had not scored against Texas before this game.

1903

at Texas 29, Texas A&M 6

1904

at Texas 34,

Texas A&M 6

The final score could have been worse for the Aggies: The game was called at dark.

1905

at Texas 27, Texas A&M 0

1906

at Texas 24, Texas A&M 0

1907

Texas A&M 0, Texas 0

(at Dallas)

1907

at Texas 11, Texas A&M 6

1908

Texas 24, Texas A&M 8

(at Houston)

1908

at Texas 28, Texas A&M 12

1909

Texas 23, Texas A&M 0

(at Houston)

1909

at Texas 5, Texas A&M 0

1910

Texas A&M 14, Texas 8

(at Houston)

1911

at Texas 6,

Texas A&M 0

(at Houston)

After Texas' victory, Texas A&M received a letter stating that Texas would not be scheduling A&M the following season. The series, which had increased in intensity both on and off the field, went on a three-year hiatus.

1915

at Texas A&M 13,

Texas 0

The series resumed with the formation of the Southwest Conference. With both members of the conference, A&M finally was able to have Texas play in College Station. A&M's defense forced 12 fumbles and converted two into touchdowns. It was the score of this game that A&M students two years later branded onto Texas' longhorn steer. The "13-0" brand was turned into "BEVO," and Texas' mascot had its name.

1916

at Texas 21, Texas A&M 7

1917

at Texas A&M 7, Texas 0

1918

at Texas 7, Texas A&M 0

1919

at Texas A&M 7, Texas 0

1920

at Texas 7,

Texas A&M 3

An estimated 20,000 -- the largest crowd to witness a game in the state -- assembled for a matchup of unbeaten teams. Texas had allowed 10 points all season, and Texas A&M had not allowed a point in two years. Texas' Francis Domingues scored on a short run that was set up by a tackle-eligible pass to Tom Dennis in what some consider the best A&M-Texas game ever.

1921

Texas 0, at Texas A&M 0

1922

Texas A&M 14,

at Texas 7

A&M won the first time at Texas' Clark Field.

1923

Texas 6, at Texas A&M 0

1924

at Texas 7,

Texas A&M 0

More than 35,000 fans that packed Texas' new Memorial Stadium celebrated when the Longhorns' Stookie Allen scored the only touchdown on a fourth-down pass.

An Aggie defender tried

to bat the pass down but instead knocked the ball

into Allen's hands.

1925

at Texas A&M 28, Texas 0

1926

at Texas 14, Texas A&M 5

1927

at Texas A&M 28, Texas 7

1928

at Texas 19, Texas A&M 0

1929

at Texas A&M 13, Texas 0

1930

at Texas 26, Texas A&M 0

1931

at Texas A&M 7, Texas 6

1932

at Texas 21, Texas A&M 0

1933

Texas 10, at Texas A&M 10

1934

at Texas 13, Texas A&M 0

1935

at Texas A&M 20, Texas 6

1936

at Texas 7, Texas A&M 0

1937

at Texas A&M 7, Texas 0

1938

at Texas 7, Texas A&M 6

1939

at Texas A&M 20, Texas 0

1940

at Texas 7,

Texas A&M 0

The Longhorns ended

defending national champion Texas A&M's 19-game

winning streak on Pete Layden's 1-yard touchdown run on the game's fourth play. Noble Doss' "impossible catch" set up the Layden's score.

1941

Texas 23, at Texas A&M 0

1942

at Texas 12, Texas A&M 6

1943

Texas 27, at Texas A&M 13

1944

at Texas 6, Texas A&M 0

1945

Texas 20, at Texas A&M 10

1946

at Texas 24, Texas A&M 7

1947

Texas 32, at Texas A&M 13

1948

Texas A&M 14, at Texas 14

1949

Texas 42, at Texas A&M 14

1950

at Texas 17, Texas A&M 0

1951

at Texas A&M 22, Texas 21

1952

at Texas 32, Texas A&M 12

1953

Texas 21, at Texas A&M 12

1954

at Texas 22, Texas A&M 13

1955

Texas 21, at Texas A&M 6

1956

Texas A&M 34,

at Texas 21

In Bear Bryant's third year as A&M coach, the Aggies won in Memorial Stadium for the first time since it opened in 1924. The Aggies ended their season with a 9-0-1 record and sent the Longhorns to a miserable 1-9 record. A&M won its first SWC title in 15 years but was ineligible for the Cotton Bowl because of recruiting violations.

1957

Texas 9,

at Texas A&M 7

First-year Texas coach Darrell Royal and Bear Bryant stood as head coaches on opposing sidelines for the only time in the series. The Longhorns went to College Station and upset the fourth-ranked Aggies and eventual Heisman Trophy winner John David Crow, the only Aggie to win college football's top honor.

1958

at Texas 27, Texas A&M 0

1959

Texas 20, at Texas A&M 17

1960

at Texas 21, Texas A&M 14

1961

Texas 25, at Texas A&M 0

1962

at Texas 13, Texas A&M 3

1963

Texas 15, at Texas A&M 13

1964

at Texas 26, Texas A&M 7

1965

Texas 21, at Texas A&M 17

1966

at Texas 22, Texas A&M 14

1967

at Texas A&M 10, Texas 7

Edd Hargett's 80-yard touchdown pass to Bob Long ended Darrell Royal's and Texas' 10-year reign in the series. The SWC-champion Aggies, coached by Gene Stallings, went on to defeat Bear Bryant's Alabama team in the Cotton Bowl.

1968

at Texas 35, Texas A&M 14

1969

Texas 49, at Texas A&M 12

1970

at Texas 52, Texas A&M 14

1971

Texas 34, at Texas A&M 14

1972

at Texas 38, Texas A&M 3

1973

Texas 42, at Texas A&M 13

1974

at Texas 32, Texas A&M 3

1975

at Texas A&M 20, Texas 10

Emory Bellard's second-ranked A&M team held the No. 5 Longhorns to 179 total yards and created a three-way tie for the SWC title -- between A&M, Texas and Arkansas -- with the Aggies earning the Cotton Bowl berth. The Aggies had lost seven consecutive games to Texas.

1976

Texas A&M 27,

at Texas 3

Texas A&M won in Austin for the first time since 1956.

1977

Texas 57,

at Texas A&M 28

Earl Campbell, on his way to the Heisman Trophy, rushed for 222 yards and four touchdowns and Randy McEachern passed for four touchdowns as No. 1-ranked Texas routed the second-ranked Aggies by scoring what remains the most points for either team in series history. The win gave the Longhorns an 11-0 regular season, but they lost to Notre Dame in the Cotton Bowl.

1978

at Texas 22, Texas A&M 7

1979

at Texas A&M 13,

Texas 7

The Aggies, who entered the game at 5-5, upset the sixth-ranked Longhorns to knock them out of a share of the SWC championship.

1980

Texas A&M 24, at Texas 14

1981

Texas 21, at Texas A&M 13

1982

at Texas 53, Texas A&M 16

1983

Texas 45,

at Texas A&M 13

With No. 2 Texas unbeaten and in the national championship picture, the Aggies jumped out to a 13-0 lead. Texas quarterback Rick McIvor entered the game just before halftime and sparked the No. 2 Longhorns to a 45-point outburst. Texas' unbeaten season ended in a 10-9 loss to Georgia in the Cotton Bowl.

1984

Texas A&M 37,

at Texas 12

With a 5-5 record, Texas A&M led 20-0 at halftime then blocked a field goal to thwart a second-half rally by No. 13 Texas, which had spent the first eight weeks of the season ranked in the nation's top four. Aggies players carried coach Jackie Sherrill off the field. Sherrill declared the victory as "the greatest win we've had at Texas A&M."

1985

at Texas A&M 42, Texas 10

No. 15 Texas A&M rolled to its widest margin of victory in the series in defeating the 18th-ranked Longhorns to win its first outright SWC championship in 18 years. That was the first of three consecutive outright conference titles under Jackie Sherrill before the Aggies were placed on probation for recruiting violations.

1986

Texas A&M 16, at Texas 3

1987

at Texas A&M 20, Texas 13

1988

Texas A&M 28, at Texas 24

1989

at Texas A&M 21, Texas 10

1990

at Texas 28, Texas A&M 27

1991

at Texas A&M 31, Texas 14

1992

Texas A&M 34, at Texas 13

1993

at Texas A&M 18, Texas 9

1994

Texas A&M 34, at Texas 10

1995

Texas 16,

at Texas A&M 6

Texas ended A&M's 31-game home winning streak and clinched the final championship in Southwest Conference history. The Aggies, who had not lost at home to Texas since 1983, were held without a touchdown for the first time in eight seasons.

1996

at Texas 51,

Texas A&M 15

In the first year of the Big 12 Conference, Texas romped to the South Division title behind James Brown's 336 yards and four touchdowns passing.

1997

at Texas A&M 27, Texas 16

1998

at Texas 26,

Texas A&M 24

No. 6 A&M fell behind 23-7 before rallying to take a 24-23 lead with 2:20 left. Major Applewhite then led the unranked Longhorns on a drive that ended with Kris Stockton's game-winning, 24-yard field goal. Texas' Ricky Williams rushed for 259 yards to break Tony Dorsett's NCAA career rushing record.

1999

at Texas A&M 20, Texas 16

Eight days before the

game, 12 Texas A&M students were killed and 27 were injured while preparing the stack of logs for the annual bonfire before

the Texas game. At an

emotional Kyle Field, the 24th-ranked Aggies upset No. 7 Texas, which had clinched the Big 12 South Division title.

2000

at Texas 43,

Texas A&M 17

No. 12 Texas' Chris Simms passed for 383 yards -- the most by a Longhorn against A&M -- and three touchdowns to lead his team to a convincing victory against the No. 22 Aggies.

2001

Texas 21, at Texas A&M 7

2002

at Texas 50, Texas A&M 20

2003

Texas 46, at Texas A&M 15

2004

at Texas 26, Texas A&M 13

2005

Texas 40,

at Texas A&M 29

At 5-5, Texas A&M threatened to pull off one of the biggest upsets in series history. The Aggies led 22-21 in the third quarter before the unbeaten Longhorns scored on Ramonce Taylor's 8-yard run and Cedric Griffin's blocked punt return. After routing Colorado 70-3 in the Big 12 title game, Texas defeated USC in the Rose Bowl to win the national championship.

2006

Texas A&M 12, at Texas 7

2007

at Texas A&M 38, Texas 30

Texas A&M took a 17-0 first-half lead and led by as much as 38-17 before Texas rallied. But the Aggies held on in what turned out to be coach Dennis Franchione's last appearance on the Aggies' sideline. After the game, he resigned in the wake of controversy over his VIP Newsletter.

2008

at Texas 49, Texas A&M 9

2009

Texas 49,

at Texas A&M 39

Texas quarterback Colt

McCoy passed for 304 yards four touchdowns and Texas A&M quarterback Jerrod Johnson threw for 342 yards and four scores. The victory kept the third-ranked Longhorns undefeated. They eventually lost to Alabama in the BCS National Championship game.

2010

Texas A&M 24, at Texas 17

Sources: The Aggies and the 'Horns: 86 Years of Bad Blood and Good Football; Backyard Brawl; Stadium Stories: Texas A&M Aggies; University of Texas publications; Texas A&M University publications; Star-Telegram research.

Join the Discussion

Fort Worth Star-Telegram is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere on the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQ | Terms of Service