No end to oil crisis

06/25/2014 6:00 PM

06/25/2014 6:00 PM

Bernard L. Weinstein claims in the next four years “the U.S. will have reclaimed its crown as the planet’s No. 1 oil producer” (See: “Energy is America’s economic trump card,” Sunday)

So why are we paying almost $4 a gallon for fuel? Refineries!

The U.S. has built only six refineries since 1980. We can’t get it out of the ground fast enough and turn it into fuel to meet the demand.

He paints a rosy picture of how well our economy is, but keep raising the price of fuel and we’ll see what happens then. No vacation trips, no going period.

When Americans stop driving we stop spending. What, Weinstein, will that do to the economy?

As far as the Middle East, they will never stop fighting each other until they are all dead.

This oil crisis will never be over until we become self-sufficient and drill, produce and refine more, and keep it to ourselves and stop talking hooey about our “energy trump card.”

— Wade Parkey, Roanoke

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