A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office.
A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office. Callie Richmond The Texas Tribune
A section of border fence cuts through the Nature Conservancy’s Lennox Foundation Southmost Preserve near Brownsville. Because the land is home to several endangered plant and animal species, the conservancy thought it would be able to force the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to build the fence elsewhere. But “our compelling arguments were not that compelling to the federal government,” said Laura Huffman, head of the Nature Conservancy’s Texas office. Callie Richmond The Texas Tribune

Texas

Instead of a border wall, some Texans want parks, solar panels or levees

March 24, 2017 11:16 AM

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