In this Monday, Jan. 12, photo, Texas Supreme Court archivist Tiffany Shopshire shows the 1816 publishing date at the bottom of a page in the Sam Houston Bible, in Austin, Texas. Amateur historians have long thought that Sam Houston's signature was on the missing half of a page, but new evidence is raising doubts about whether the Bible used to swear-in Texas governors for nearly two centuries ever actually belonged to Houston. (AP Photo/Paul Weber)
In this Monday, Jan. 12, photo, Texas Supreme Court archivist Tiffany Shopshire shows the 1816 publishing date at the bottom of a page in the Sam Houston Bible, in Austin, Texas. Amateur historians have long thought that Sam Houston's signature was on the missing half of a page, but new evidence is raising doubts about whether the Bible used to swear-in Texas governors for nearly two centuries ever actually belonged to Houston. (AP Photo/Paul Weber) Paul Weber AP
In this Monday, Jan. 12, photo, Texas Supreme Court archivist Tiffany Shopshire shows the 1816 publishing date at the bottom of a page in the Sam Houston Bible, in Austin, Texas. Amateur historians have long thought that Sam Houston's signature was on the missing half of a page, but new evidence is raising doubts about whether the Bible used to swear-in Texas governors for nearly two centuries ever actually belonged to Houston. (AP Photo/Paul Weber) Paul Weber AP

Bible story: Doubts raised over a Texas inaugural tradition

January 19, 2015 02:23 PM

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