A truck passes a red light photo enforcement sign placed below a red light camera in Lawrence Township, N.J., on Dec. 16, 2014. Red-light cameras are widely hated, but a new study says getting rid of them can have fatal consequences. Traffic deaths from red-light-running crashes go up by nearly a third after cities turn off cameras designed to catch motorists in the act, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The institute is funded by auto insurers.
A truck passes a red light photo enforcement sign placed below a red light camera in Lawrence Township, N.J., on Dec. 16, 2014. Red-light cameras are widely hated, but a new study says getting rid of them can have fatal consequences. Traffic deaths from red-light-running crashes go up by nearly a third after cities turn off cameras designed to catch motorists in the act, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The institute is funded by auto insurers. Mel Evans AP
A truck passes a red light photo enforcement sign placed below a red light camera in Lawrence Township, N.J., on Dec. 16, 2014. Red-light cameras are widely hated, but a new study says getting rid of them can have fatal consequences. Traffic deaths from red-light-running crashes go up by nearly a third after cities turn off cameras designed to catch motorists in the act, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The institute is funded by auto insurers. Mel Evans AP

Turning off red-light cameras has consequences

July 27, 2016 11:24 PM