A researcher removes depleted nutrient medium from plates containing embryonic stem cells at the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures in Sacramento in 2011. New guidelines from the International Society for Stem Cell Research urge scientists to be more careful touting the promise, largely yet unproven, of using stem cells to treat ailments and injuries.
A researcher removes depleted nutrient medium from plates containing embryonic stem cells at the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures in Sacramento in 2011. New guidelines from the International Society for Stem Cell Research urge scientists to be more careful touting the promise, largely yet unproven, of using stem cells to treat ailments and injuries. Autumn Cruz The Sacramento Bee, file
A researcher removes depleted nutrient medium from plates containing embryonic stem cells at the UC Davis Institute for Regenerative Cures in Sacramento in 2011. New guidelines from the International Society for Stem Cell Research urge scientists to be more careful touting the promise, largely yet unproven, of using stem cells to treat ailments and injuries. Autumn Cruz The Sacramento Bee, file

Stop stem cell science hype, scientists say

May 15, 2016 6:32 PM

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