FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2014 file photo, Christian evangelist Franklin Graham speaks in Erie, Pa. as part of a music and evangelism festival. On Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, just days after announcing that a traditional Muslim call to prayer would echo from the historic chapel tower, Duke University changed course after being bombarded with calls and emails objecting to the plan. The original plan drew the ire of Graham, the son of the Rev. Billy Graham, who urged Duke alumni to withhold support because of violence against Christians that he attributed to Muslims. (AP Photo/Erie Times-News, Greg Wohlford)
FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2014 file photo, Christian evangelist Franklin Graham speaks in Erie, Pa. as part of a music and evangelism festival. On Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, just days after announcing that a traditional Muslim call to prayer would echo from the historic chapel tower, Duke University changed course after being bombarded with calls and emails objecting to the plan. The original plan drew the ire of Graham, the son of the Rev. Billy Graham, who urged Duke alumni to withhold support because of violence against Christians that he attributed to Muslims. (AP Photo/Erie Times-News, Greg Wohlford) Greg Wohlford AP
FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2014 file photo, Christian evangelist Franklin Graham speaks in Erie, Pa. as part of a music and evangelism festival. On Thursday, Jan. 15, 2015, just days after announcing that a traditional Muslim call to prayer would echo from the historic chapel tower, Duke University changed course after being bombarded with calls and emails objecting to the plan. The original plan drew the ire of Graham, the son of the Rev. Billy Graham, who urged Duke alumni to withhold support because of violence against Christians that he attributed to Muslims. (AP Photo/Erie Times-News, Greg Wohlford) Greg Wohlford AP

Muslims in North Texas among those in U.S. feeling backlash from attack in Paris

January 16, 2015 06:32 PM

More Videos

  • How does the FBI learn to diffuse bombs? Here at the Hazardous Devices School

    The FBI’s Hazardous Devices School at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, plays a key role in training and certifying all of the nation’s public safety bomb technicians.