In this Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 photo, Jake Bunch uses his phone to mark the position of an abandoned crab pot off Half Moon Bay, Calif. Fisherman like Bunch are using GPS positioning in their cellphones to voluntarily step up recovery of abandoned crab pots before they snare whales. Some environmental groups say the state should put in place more mandatory protection measures, such as blocking fishermen from especially important waters for whales.
In this Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 photo, Jake Bunch uses his phone to mark the position of an abandoned crab pot off Half Moon Bay, Calif. Fisherman like Bunch are using GPS positioning in their cellphones to voluntarily step up recovery of abandoned crab pots before they snare whales. Some environmental groups say the state should put in place more mandatory protection measures, such as blocking fishermen from especially important waters for whales. Eric Risberg AP Photo
In this Monday, Aug. 7, 2017 photo, Jake Bunch uses his phone to mark the position of an abandoned crab pot off Half Moon Bay, Calif. Fisherman like Bunch are using GPS positioning in their cellphones to voluntarily step up recovery of abandoned crab pots before they snare whales. Some environmental groups say the state should put in place more mandatory protection measures, such as blocking fishermen from especially important waters for whales. Eric Risberg AP Photo

California crabbers use GPS to find whale-killing gear

September 14, 2017 11:20 AM