Eugene McCray Park on the Fort Worth side of Lake Arlington shows signs of neglect — a downed stop sign is one of the first things visitors see when they enter the park on the pot-holed and litter-lined Quail Road. The road, which dead ends, leads drivers to the park entrance, but the backdrop for the welcome sign is a row of porta potties. Pictured on April 6. 
Councilwoman Gyna Bivens, who represents the area, wants to change that.
Eugene McCray Park on the Fort Worth side of Lake Arlington shows signs of neglect — a downed stop sign is one of the first things visitors see when they enter the park on the pot-holed and litter-lined Quail Road. The road, which dead ends, leads drivers to the park entrance, but the backdrop for the welcome sign is a row of porta potties. Pictured on April 6. Councilwoman Gyna Bivens, who represents the area, wants to change that. Ron Jenkins Star-Telegram
Eugene McCray Park on the Fort Worth side of Lake Arlington shows signs of neglect — a downed stop sign is one of the first things visitors see when they enter the park on the pot-holed and litter-lined Quail Road. The road, which dead ends, leads drivers to the park entrance, but the backdrop for the welcome sign is a row of porta potties. Pictured on April 6. Councilwoman Gyna Bivens, who represents the area, wants to change that. Ron Jenkins Star-Telegram

Lake Arlington on Fort Worth councilwoman’s to-do list

April 16, 2015 07:45 PM

UPDATED April 17, 2015 01:23 PM

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