Texas Gov. Perry's DPS guards file for more presidential travel expenses

07/07/2012 11:16 PM

07/07/2012 11:34 PM

AUSTIN -- Department of Public Safety officers who protected Gov. Rick Perry as he crisscrossed the country running for president have filed for $104,000 more in backlogged travel expenses, according to state records released Friday. That raises the total cost of his failed White House bid to Texas taxpayers to at least $3.7 million.

The DPS reported spending about $104,000 on airfare, food, fuel, lodging and other expenses as it provided security for Perry from September to January. Those expenses were not yet processed when the agency released quarterly records in March that detailed $1.8 million in travel expenses as its agents protected Perry and his family on the campaign trail.

The agency also paid at least $1.8 million in overtime compensation to its agents while Perry was a presidential candidate, according to reports previously obtained by The Associated Press using open-records requests. The latest round of additional travel expenses pushes the total security expenditures to more than $3.7 million, but additional bills -- such as holdover travel expenses or overtime filings that could appear in the department's future reports -- could raise the cost to taxpayers more.

Perry announced his presidential bid in South Carolina on Aug. 13 and called off his campaign in the same state Jan. 19. For security reasons, Texas does not reveal how many troopers accompany the governor or how far in advance they arrive.

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