Doctor with Ebola treated as church urges prayer

Sunday, Jul. 27, 2014

Dr. Kent Brantly of Fort Worth is working on his computer and talking as he receives treatment for the deadly virus.

After infertility, Wichita Falls couple is surprised with quadruplets

| |Saturday, Jul. 26, 2014

Jereme Barrera says he and his wife “dreamed of having one boy and one girl” and ended up with two of each.

Tarrant County sees flurry of child drownings

| |Friday, Jul. 25, 2014

Cook Children’s Medical Center urges parents to remain vigilant of children near water sources this summer.

Measles case confirmed in Northeast Tarrant County

| |Wednesday, Jul. 23, 2014

Health officials are urging doctors to be on the lookout for more cases.

Cook Children’s new center focuses on child abuse

| |Wednesday, Jul. 23, 2014

The Center for the Prevention of Child Maltreatment aims to reduce the staggering number of abused and neglected children in Tarrant County through training and outreach.

Tarrant residents urged to wash produce to prevent cyclosporiasis

| |Tuesday, Jul. 22, 2014

Cases of cyclosporiasis, which can cause prolonged diarrhea and other problems, have surged across Tarrant County and Texas in the last month.

North Richland Hills bans sale of e-cigarettes to minors

| |Saturday, Jul. 19, 2014

The council also approved an ordinance that requires any new tobacco shops to apply for a special use permit.

Doctors groups team up with clinics inside pharmacy chains

| |Wednesday, Jul. 16, 2014

Texas Health Resources contracts with CVS Caremark and Baylor Scott & White Health joins Walgreens to make its doctors available to supervise and consult at in-store clinics.

Efforts to boost air quality getting little traction in DFW

| |Monday, Jul. 21, 2014

Despite warnings from experts about the effect on public health in Dallas-Fort Worth, government officials still haven’t developed comprehensive policies or solutions to the region’s ozone problem.

New brain protein tied to Alzheimer's disease

| |Wednesday, Jul. 16, 2014

Scientists have linked a new protein to Alzheimer's disease, different from the amyloid and tau that make up the sticky brain plaques and tangles long known to be its hallmarks.