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Use of longtime U.S. motto draws attention to Tarrant County

Posted Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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Four little words are drawing a big reaction.

Tarrant County Tax Assessor Collector Ron Wright recently added the national motto that already decorates paper money — In God We Trust — to the backside of his office’s envelopes. It soon will be on tax statements themselves and every official document for the office.

“I’ve been thinking about it for some time,” he said. “This is the official motto of the United States of America, and I think it should be used by public entities more often.”

He said he has heard from supporters and detractors.

One supporter, a woman in Kansas, even sent Wright a $3 check to cover the cost of the change.

A detractor recently sent a letter to the Star-Telegram saying she was “shocked” at the change.

Anyone who hasn’t seen it will get the chance when around 1 million tax statements are sent out later this year.

“My message to other public officials is be not afraid,” Wright said. “This is the official motto of the United States of America. Use it.”

Political game play?

Politics seeps into nearly every facet of life, but it doesn’t often make its way into the gaming arena.

It has now, though, with the creation of Battlefield Hardline, which is scheduled to be released in March.

In this game, a character that can be shot by players rants about being a “one-man island of armed sovereignty” and is a scene where a Gadsden flag — which depicts a coiled rattlesnake with the words “Don’t Tread on Me” and in recent years has become a symbol of the Tea Party movement — is displayed on a wall, reports Breitbart, a conservative publication.

Texans make ‘Most Beautiful’ list

So, not everyone thinks the most beautiful people in the U.S. can be found in Washington, D.C.

But, once again, The Hill, a slightly irreverent news outlet that covers Capitol Hill, found the 50 best-looking people that work in or around Congress, and Fort Worth’s own Kimberly Willingham ranked No. 2.

“That was a real shock,” Willingham, 28, the communications director for U.S. Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Tyler, said with a laugh.

A graduate of Temple Christian School in Fort Worth and Baylor University, she has been in D.C. since 2008.

After working at Fox News and for U.S. Rep. Ted Poe, R-Humble, she moved over to Gohmert’s office about four years ago.

But she is coming home soon — to get married.

She is engaged to Taylor Hubbard, an attorney, and their wedding is scheduled Oct. 11 at the Fort Worth Botanical Garden. They will live in Alexandria, Va., after the wedding.

Willingham’s parents are Scott and Theresa Willingham of Fort Worth, and she has a younger sister, Kristen, who is a health instructor at Texas A&M. Her grandmother Billie Willingham and late grandfather James Willingham were both longtime educators for the Fort Worth school district.

There were three other Texans on The Hill's most Beautiful 50 list: Ross Gage, 27, of Stephenville, No. 16, who is a legislative assistant to U.S. Rep. Roger Williams, R-Austin; Caleb Crosswhite, 25, of McKinney, who ranked 28th, is a staffer on the House Agriculture Committee; and Dottie Bond, 30, from Dallas, a lobbyist who came in at No. 32.

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