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Hot Tickets for August

Posted Wednesday, Aug. 06, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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Celebrity Castaway

Just opened in Tahiti, The Brando offers access to the pristine 12-isle atoll of Tetiaroa, which originally seduced namesake Marlon Brando to move to the South Pacific. The atoll, where he filmed Mutiny on the Bounty in 1962, now hosts 35 villas, each with its own plunge pool and outdoor bathtub. Scuba diving and beachcombing tempt explorers, while foodies will appreciate menus from Michelin-starred chef Guy Martin. Channeling Brando’s passion for the environment, the green-built resort includes a scientific research station supporting climate studies. Villas from $2,455, with a minimum stay of three consecutive nights, all-inclusive, www.thebrando.com.

Go West and Glamp

A trend that just keeps growing, glamping — aka “glamorous camping” — is only getting more upscale. In Utah, the new Moab Under Canvas introduces luxury tents with en-suite bathrooms and more basic teepees to the red rock landscape near Arches and Canyonlands national parks. More luxurious, the eight tents at Dunton River Camp (pictured) in the Colorado Rockies near Telluride sit 20 feet from the trout-filled Dolores River and include gas stoves, furnished porches and bathrooms with 6-foot soaking tubs. A restored 19th-century farmhouse acts as mess hall, and guests have access to Dunton Hot Springs, a resurrected mining town-turned-resort with piping hot spring-fed pools, four miles down the road. Moab Under Canvas, $89-$425, 801-895-3213, www.moabundercanvas.com; Dunton River Camp from $1,400, all-inclusive, 877-228-4674, www.duntonhotsprings.com.

The Arty Side of Aspen

From the Aspen Ideas Festival to celebrity-chef restaurants and luxury shops, Aspen has long sold itself as more than a ski destination. Come Aug. 9, when the newly expanded Aspen Art Museum opens, the 33,000-square-foot building by Japanese architect Shigeru Ban will make a significant cultural contribution to the city’s diversity. Entering the glass-walled museum, visitors take a transparent elevator to the top floor, where the rooftop sculpture garden offers views to nearby Ajax Mountain, and work their way down four levels. Six galleries showcase contemporary exhibits, including an inaugural one on the Pritzker Prize-winning architect himself. Free admission; 970-925-8050, www.aspenartmuseum.org.

An Asian in Paris

Just steps from the Arc de Triomphe in the polished 16th arrondissement, the much-anticipated Peninsula Paris opened Aug. 1. Built as a hotel in 1908 — composer George Gershwin wrote An American in Paris here in 1928 — the grand building underwent five years of reconstruction courtesy of the Asia-based Peninsula chain to restore mosaics, gold leaf and wood carvings and dug down three levels to accommodate a swimming pool and six-room spa. Now among 200 tranquil rooms, five feature their own private rooftop gardens. Dine on Cantonese and French fare in six settings, ranging from a rooftop restaurant to a garden terrace and an oak-paneled bar. Rooms from $1,500; 866-382-8388, www.peninsula.com.

Fish Like a Local As it turns 1 year old, Canada’s middle-of-nowhere architectural treasure, Fogo Island Inn in Newfoundland, aims to introduce guests to local lifestyles. Island-made furniture, quilts and rugs fill the ultra-modern, stilt-supported lodge, housing 29 rooms with floor-to-ceiling windows a stone’s throw from the ocean. Local community hosts offer complimentary tours of the island, but for those who want an even richer experience, new packages offer opportunities to fish for cod, hike the quarry on which Newfoundland was built, or learn to make the region’s traditional wooden boats known as punts. Rates at $1,495 per night with a two-night minimum, including tours and meals; 855-268-9277, www.fogoislandinn.ca.

Archer in the Big Apple

A new hotel brand, poised to come to Texas, debuted this summer with the opening of the Archer New York. The 180-room hotel in Manhattan’s Garment District restores hospitality to the trade by stocking the room with complimentary caramels and bottled water, and offering generous turndown goodies such as cupcakes. Drawing locals as well as guests, food and drink features include a 22nd-story rooftop bar facing the Empire State Building and a lobby restaurant by chef David Burke. Request a corner room for loft-style quarters, including wood floors and exposed brick walls. The next Archer will break ground in Austin this fall. Rooms from $249 (opening special), 855-437-9100, www.archerhotel.com.

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