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Local congressional delegation claims victory

Posted Wednesday, Mar. 05, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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Local congressional leaders easily won their primary elections Tuesday night.

Early results Tuesday showed Republican U.S. Reps. Joe Barton and Michael Burgess and Democrat U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey taking strong leads in their races — and they never let up.

Here’s a look at the final numbers, according to complete, unofficial results from the Texas secretary of state’s office.

District 6

Barton, a longtime representative from Ennis, won with nearly 73 percent of the vote to challenger Frank Kuchar’s 27 percent.

Barton’s top priorities include getting government spending under control, balancing the budget and repealing or replacing Obamacare.

Kuchar, an Arlington accountant who also ran against Barton in 2012, said he wanted to replace the income tax system with a consumption tax, curtain spending and address immigration.

District 6 includes most of Arlington and Mansfield and all of Ellis and Navarro counties.

District 25

U.S. Rep. Roger Williams, who represents the district that stretches from Tarrant County to Austin, faced no challenger in the Republican primary.

But two Democrats faced off to determine who would challenge the incumbent in the November general election.

Marco Montoya of Austin claimed nearly 75 percent of the vote to the 25 percent claimed by Stuart Gourd of Austin.

The district draws its biggest population base from the Austin area, but it includes thousands of residents in Johnson and Tarrant counties.

District 26

Burgess, a Lewisville obstetrician for nearly 30 years, handily won his primary election, claiming 82 percent of the vote over challenger Joel Krause’s 15 percent and Divenchy Watrous’ less than 2 percent.

Krause, a small-business owner from Highland Village, said he entered the race because he was worried about the economy, the deficit and the fact he believed “we are no longer begin governed by or for the people.”

Watrous, an operations manager from Lewisville, said he was in the race because “it is my duty to be the change I desire to see.”

This district covers all of Denton County, part of Wise County and a patch of northern Tarrant County that includes Westlake, north Keller and far north Fort Worth.

District 33

Veasey, a former state representative, easily won his primary re-election bid, picking up 73 percent of the vote over challenger Tom Sanchez’s 26 percent.

Veasey, who picked up an endorsement from President Barack Obama, has said jobs, healthcare and immigration reform are among the top issues in the race. He said he believed his challenger was a Republican in disguise because of his past records of voting for GOP candidates and donating to their campaigns as well.

Sanchez, an attorney specializing in smartphone patent technology who was making his first bid for office, was largely self-funding his campaign. He said he was running for office because he didn’t believe Veasey has done enough for the community.

He conceded early.

“We are proud of our campaign, grateful to our supporters and will continue our efforts to stop this administration’s cruel deportation policies,” Sanchez said after calling Veasey to congratulate him on the victory.

This district stretches from Fort Worth’s Stockyards to Dallas’ Oak Cliff neighborhood.

Other races

Republican U.S. Reps. Kay Granger of Fort Worth and Kenny Marchant of Coppell faced no primary opponents, but both face challengers in the November general election. Granger is a former mayor of Fort Worth who has risen in House GOP leadership ranks.

Anna M. Tinsley, 817-390-7610 Twitter: @annatinsley

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