Retired military vehicles hit the auction block

Posted Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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What to do

• To see the vehicles online, go to the Government Liquidation website.

• To see them in person, go to the local TruckCenter.com site at 1121 Cantrell Sansom Road. The mailing address is in Fort Worth, but the lot is actually in Blue Mound. Officials say visitors are welcome during the regular workweek: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday.

• For more information, call TruckCenter.com at 817-306-1880.

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Looking for a 5-ton Army cargo truck?

Maybe a camouflage dump truck is more your style.

Either way, these and other vehicles that have been retired by the military are on the online auction block, available to buyers for the starting price of $25.

“They were all used by the military and now they are surplus,” said Gary Knifong, site manager at TruckCenter.com, where the vehicles are being stored. “A lot of them look like they are brand-new.”

Two online auctions of former military vehicles are scheduled to start Tuesday and Feb. 3. Another auction wrapped up last week.

Before bidding, potential buyers can look at the supersize vehicles by visiting the Fort Worth Truck Center, where the Defense Department sends retired equipment to be auctioned, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Visitors will encounter vehicles such as a 1992 BMY soft-top 6x6 cargo truck by Harsco, model M923A2.

This truck is powered by a Cummins 8.3-liter, six-cylinder diesel engine and an Allison automatic transmission. The odometer reads 13,806 miles, and the sale includes a spare tire, a pintle hook, two toolboxes, troop seats and a tarp. The truck runs, but there are no keys.

Another listing is for a 1992 BMY hardtop 6x6 cargo truck by Harsco, model M923A2.

It also has a Cummins 8.3-liter, six-cylinder diesel engine and an Allison automatic transmission. The odometer shows 8,167 miles, and the deal includes a spare tire, a pintle hook, two toolboxes, troop seats and a tarp. The right-side mirror is loose, and the left rear tire is flat. The truck runs, but there are no keys.

Many of the vehicles are in running condition. But some “will require a jump-start and/or a little TLC to get them up and running,” according to a statement about the auction.

Knifong said similar vehicles have been bought by small-business owners who use them for construction and farm work or resell them at a profit.

But some people buy them just for fun.

In the most recent online auction, some 5-ton hardtop cargo trucks sold for less than $3,000, according to the auction site.

The vehicles are for sale through the Defense Department auction site Government Liquidation.

After the auction, buyers have 10 days to head out to the lot and pick up their purchase, Knifong said.

Auctions are held over and over throughout the country as the government sells tens of thousands of used military vehicles.

Some are up for sale because they are past their prime. Others simply don’t meet the military’s ever-evolving technology needs, according to GovernmentAuctions.org, which is not involved in this auction.

The local auction site is one of more than 300 places nationwide where items no longer needed by the Defense Department are stored and ultimately listed for auction. An electric fence surrounds the property.

Around 50 vehicles at the local site are listed for auction. More equipment is expected to be auctioned later in the year.

Anna M. Tinsley, 817-390-7610 Twitter: @annatinsley

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