City by City: Fort Worth area

Posted Friday, Jan. 10, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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FORT WORTH

Empty Bowls benefit for food bank will be March 27

Save the date of March 27 for ceramic, china and wooden bowls and tastes of top chefs’ soups and desserts.

“Empty Bowls Fort Worth — An Artful Taste to End Hunger” will benefit Tarrant Area Food Bank.

The tableware is the top attraction. Guests can purchase celebrity bowls signed by entertainers, sports figures, musicians and authors or gallery bowls created by master artisans. Each of the estimated 1,500 guests can claim a complimentary keepsake bowl made by professional, student or recreational artists. A silent auction of pottery, art and other items will be held.

Tasting of soups and desserts will be available from more than 30 top Fort Worth-area chefs and favorite eateries.

Empty Bowls will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Texas Hall inside Amon G. Carter Exhibit Hall, Will Rogers Memorial Center, 3401 W. Lancaster Ave.

Tickets are $50 for general admission and $130 for a VIP pass allowing early entrance to the event. For tickets and more information, visit tafb.org/anevents-ebowls.html or call 817-332-9177.

— Shirley Jinkins

Civil War round table’s award winner to give talk

The winner of the Fort Worth Civil War Round Table’s Pate Award for best new book on original research in Civil War history focusing on the western theater of the war will speak at the group’s monthly meeting Tuesday.

Linda Barnickel’s book Milliken’s Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory looks at a controversial battle fought in June 1863 where a brigade of Texas Confederates attacked a federal outpost about 15 miles north of Vicksburg, Miss. The Union force was predominately made up of black troops who had been slaves less than two months before the battle.

The former slaves fought well despite their minimal training and helped prove to the Northern public that black men were fit for combat. After the battle, there were accusations that Confederates had executed some prisoners, including white officers and black soldiers. The charges eventually led to a congressional investigation and contributed to the suspension of prisoner exchanges between the North and South.

The presentation featuring the author from Nashville will be held at Ol’ South Pancake House at 1509 S. University Drive. Dinner is at 6 p.m. and the program begins at 7 p.m.

The free program is open to the public. Membership in the round table is $30 a year.

For more information, visit www.fortworthcwrt.com.

— Steve Campbell

Tumor foundation seeks runners for Cowtown teams

The Children’s Tumor Foundation NF Endurance Team is seeking participants for the Cowtown Marathon, half-marathon, 10K and 5K races on Feb. 22 and 23 at Will Rogers Memorial Center.

The team participates in running, swimming, and biking events to raise awareness and research funds for neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that causes tumors to grow on nerves throughout the body.

Neurofibromatosis affects 1 in 3,000 people and can lead to blindness, bone abnormalities, cancer, deafness, disfigurement, learning disabilities and disabling pain. Currently there are no effective treatments.

Team members will receive personalized training plans, a race day T-shirt, fundraising support and inspiration from children who have neurofibromatosis.

To join the team, visit ctf.kintera.org/nfecowtown2014 or contact Angela Auzston at 972-587-7814 or aauzston@ctf.org.

For more information on neurofibromatosis, the Children’s Tumor Foundation, or the team, visit www.nfendurance.org or www.ctf.org.

— Shirley Jinkins

Fort Worth Bike Sharing offering $1 Wednesdays

Fort Worth Bike Sharing is discounting its 24-hour membership on every Wednesday in January from $8 to $1.

The nonprofit organization promotes the bikes for commuting to work and recreation.

Fort Worth Bike Sharing was started with a $1 million federal grant and plans to add 10 more bike stations and 100 bikes in 2014 with another grant from the Texas Department of Transportation.

As of Tuesday, the organization had over 8,600 24-hour members and 407 annual members who had ridden over 72,000 miles.

For information, bike station locations, rates and how to operate the bikes, visit fortworthbikesharing.org.

— Caty Hirst

Veasey reschedules job fair for Jan. 24

U.S. Rep. Marc Veasey, D-Fort Worth, is hosting a 33rd Congressional District Job Fair from 8:30 a.m. to noon Jan. 24 at the Tarrant County Resource Connection Conference Center, 2300 Circle Drive in Fort Worth.

The job fair, which was rescheduled after the ice storm, is free and open to anyone looking for a job or to change careers.

For more information, go to www.veasey.house.gov or call 817-920-9086.

— Anna M. Tinsley

GRANBURY

Historian, author will talk to Civil War group

Donald Frazier, history professor at McMurry University in Abilene, will speak to members of the CenTex Civil War Roundtable on Tuesday at a dinner meeting at Spring Creek Barbeque, 317 E. U.S. 377.

The meal will begin at 5:15 p.m. and the presentation at 6:45 p.m.

Frazier is an expert on Civil War campaigns in the Trans-Mississippi and will speak on the Bayou Teche campaign, a series of battles that occurred in southern Louisiana.

His current book, Fire in the Cane Field, deals with the Civil War in Louisiana.

He has written books of regional interest, detailing Confederate activities in Texas, along the Gulf Coast and in the Southwest.

He is best known locally for writing and directing a documentary for the Texas Civil War Museum in Fort Worth.

The CenTex Roundtable meets five times a year and hosts speakers with expertise in many aspects of the Civil War.

— Shirley Jinkins

ROANOKE

Antique appraisal event set for Feb. 22

How unique are your antiques?

Bring them to the Roanoke Community Center, 312 S. Walnut St., on Feb. 22 to get them appraised.

Experts will be on hand to value glassware, rare books, jewelry, vintage apparel and other items, excluding furniture, coins and stamps.

General admission is $1, and appraisals are $5 per item.

There is a limit of three items per person, and cash only is accepted.

For more information, visit www.roanoketexas.com or call 817-491-6090.

SAGINAW

Two workshops on Obamacare scheduled

The Saginaw Public Library will host two sessions of an informational workshop about the U.S. Affordable Care Act, on Tuesday from 10 a.m. until noon and Wednesday from 4 to 6 p.m.

The workshop will be presented by the North Texas Area Community Health Centers. Representatives will provide a 20-minute PowerPoint presentation about the act and answer community members’ questions about the ACA and the Health Insurance Marketplace.

After the presentation, certified trained Marketplace application assisters will help attendees search the Marketplace, or complete a Marketplace application at www.HealthCare.gov.

RSVP for the workshop by calling 817-230-0300.

— Shirley Jinkins

City Hall open house rescheduled for Jan. 26

Residents are invited to attend an open house celebration at 2 p.m. Jan. 26 to celebrate the new City Hall at 333 W. McLeroy Blvd.

The event was rescheduled from an earlier date after the ice storm.

The new City Hall opened for business Nov. 11.

Those interested in attending may RSVP to City Secretary Janice England at jengland@ci.saginaw.tx.us or 817-230-0327.

— Shirley Jinkins

WHITE SETTLEMENT

Retired educators will hear principals’ reports

Members of White Settlement Retired School Educators Association will hear progress reports from elementary school principals at their Jan. 22 luncheon meeting at Spring Creek Barbeque at 8628 Camp Bowie West.

Lunch is at noon, followed by the program at 12:30 p.m.

Colby Kirkpatrick, principal of North Elementary, and Michael Dickinson, principal at Liberty Elementary, will speak.

Those wishing to attend the meeting do not have to be retired.

For more information, contact Marellen Patterson 817-246-9164 or visit www.trta.org/whitesettlement.

— Shirley Jinkins

REGION

Annual homeless count needs 500 volunteers

The community’s annual census of the homeless in Tarrant and Parker counties will be Jan. 23, and the Tarrant County Homeless Coalition needs about 500 volunteers for the event.

The homeless coalition coordinates the census and survey of the homeless to fill federal requirements and to understand the changing trends and nature of homelessness, according to a Fort Worth news release.

The data will also measure the degree of success in ending homelessness in Tarrant and Parker counties.

Volunteers will gather at 8:30 p.m. and deploy from four locations in Fort Worth, Arlington, Weatherford and northeast Tarrant County, and the count should conclude by about 1 a.m. The count is conducted at night, after emergency shelters have closed intake.

Volunteers should be 18 and older. Teams of three to five people are requested.

To volunteer and learn more, call 817-509-3635 or visit bit.ly/1d3I7aD.

The staging areas are:

• Fort Worth: University Christian Church Fellowship Hall, next to the TCU campus, 2720 S. University Drive.

• Arlington: Arlington Human Services Building, 501 W. Sanford St.

• Northeast Tarrant County: Community Enrichment Center, 6250 NE Loop 820, Fort Worth.

• Weatherford: International House of Pancakes, 2005 S. Main St.

— Caty Hirst

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