Cowboys lose assistant special teams coach

Posted Thursday, Jan. 09, 2014  comments  Print Reprints
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Assistant special teams coach Chris Boniol will not return to the Dallas Cowboys coaching staff in 2014, per multiple sources.

Boniol joined the Cowboys in 2010, working primarily with the kickers and punters. It was his specialty since he was a former kicker who played three years with the Cowboys and was part of the 1995 Super Bowl title team.

Boniol has helped Dan Bailey develop into one of the league's top kickers, making 89 of 98 field goals in the past three seasons. His 90.8 percent field goal accuracy rate is the highest in team history.

In 2013, Bailey made 28 of 30 field goals and was 47 of 47 on extra points.

Boniol worked his first three seasons with the Cowboys under special-teams coordinator Joe DeCamillis. He was not retained after last season and is now with the Chicago Bears.

Rich Bisaccia was the Cowboys special-teams coordinator in 2013.

With Boniol gone, the question is who is next for the Cowboys?

Bisaccia has interviewed for head coaching job with the Washington Redskins, though he will likely return to the Cowboys next season.

There has still been no word from the Cowboys on whether they will make a change with offensive coordinator Bill Callahan or defensive coordinator Monte Kiffin.

Callahan, who was hired before the 2012 season, took over play-calling duties from Garrett this season. The Cowboys ranked 16th in total offense, and their 5,461 yards were the fewest by the franchise since 2005.

There was clearly something amiss with the offense, especially on third downs where the Cowboys struggled for much of the season.

Kiffin, 73, was hired last season as the Cowboys made the change from the 3-4 to the 4-3 scheme.

The Cowboys gave up the most yards, most passing yards and most first downs in team history. They finished last in the league in total defense.

The 6,645 total yards the Cowboys allowed was the third-most in NFL history behind only the 2012 New Orleans (7,042) and the 1981 Baltimore Colts (6,793). The 388 total first downs they allowed ranks second-worst all time behind only the 406 that the ‘81 Colts allowed.

Clarence E. Hill Jr., 817-390-7760 Twitter: @clarencehilljr

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