Tarrant County records 10th West Nile virus death

Posted Monday, Oct. 15, 2012  comments  Print Reprints
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Preventing West Nile Virus

The Tarrant County Public Health Department recommends the 4Ds.

Drain standing water on your property so mosquitoes won't breed.

Use insect repellent that contains DEET.

Stay indoors at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most prevalent.

Dress in long sleeves and pants and spray insect repellent on the clothes.

West Nile virus symptoms

Most people who are infected with West Nile virus will not have any type of illness or may experience mild fever, headache and body aches before fully recovering. If illness were to occur, it would occur within 3 to 15 days of being bitten by an infected mosquito.

Symptoms

Fever, headache and body aches, occasionally with a skin rash on the trunk of the body and swollen lymph glands.

In a very few individuals, particularly the elderly, the virus can affect brain tissue, cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord), but more commonly presents as a febrile illness. Symptoms of encephalitis include rapid onset of severe headache, high fever, stiff neck (in meningitis), muscle weakness, confusion and loss of consciousness

Source: Tarrant County Public Health Department

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An elderly Arlington man with underlying health conditions became the 10th person to die of the West Nile virus in Tarrant County.

Tarrant County Public Health said the man was in his 70s, but declined to provide any more details on his death.

While everyone is at risk of being impacted by West Nile, people age 50 and older are at a higher risk of developing the more serious, neuroinvasive infection.

Symptoms can include a flu-like illness, with moderate to high fever (102 degrees or more), a severe headache, severe muscle ache or joint pain, severe eye pain, mental changes, fatigue, nausea and respiratory symptoms.

Bill Hanna, (817) -390

Twitter: @fwhanna

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