UTA big economic boost to Arlington, North Texas

Posted Friday, Sep. 28, 2012  comments  Print Reprints
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ARLINGTON - The University of Texas at Arlington has a $13.6 billion annual economic impact on the state and creates more than 122,000 permanent jobs for the north Texas region each year, according to a study released Friday.

Including spinoff research and graduates who are employed, the university has a $12.8 billion annual impact in north Texas. That represents roughly four percent of the regional economy, UTA President James D. Spaniolo announced Friday to donors and community leaders at the university's Leadership Summit luncheon.

"UT Arlington is a significant driver of the Texas economy. UT Arlington supports thousands of jobs and keeps Texas working," Spaniolo said. "The university's impact and influence extends far beyond Arlington. It extends across the region and across the state."

And UT Arlington, with more than 180 degree programs and student enrollment approaching 33,500, continues growing, Spaniolo said.

The campus' recent construction boom has also provided the north Texas region a $502.7 million economic boost, according to findings from The Perryman Group. The study on the university's impact on business activity in the state and region is the first in about a decade, school officials said.

That new construction, which includes the new $78 million College Park Center, 7,000-seat arena that opened in February, has had an estimated $539 million impact on business activity across the state, the report states.

The university also spent $126 million to build the Engineering Research Building, a 234,000-square-foot high-tech research and teaching facility that opened in January 2011. The campus' newest addition is the $82 million College Park residential and retail development that includes a 1,800-space parking garage. UTA also spent $22 million renovating the Engineering Laboratory Building in 2009.

Susan Schrock, 817-709-7578

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