mom2momdfw

Children's books capture the beauty of autumn with engaging drawings, characters

Posted Thursday, Sep. 27, 2012  comments  Print Reprints

Topics: Media, Health

Tags: ,

A

Have more to add? News tip? Tell us

Fall weather is finally here! It is time for pumpkins, colorful leaves and even the State Fair! Check out books for young readers about autumn at the Fort Worth Library.

Fall

by Ann Herriges

Bellwether Media, 2007

For ages 3-5

This book offers a brief introduction to the season of fall! Kids will learn how fall is a season of change -- the days are shorter, the air is cooler and animals prepare for winter. Beautiful, colorful photographs accompany short and simple facts on each page.

A glossary is included that defines words like "crop," "harvest" and "bulb." Resources to find more information and an index are also included.

This is part of the Blastoff Readers series and is the perfect book for children who are may just be getting interested in learning about new things. Other topics in this series include jellyfish, bunnies, cranes and trains.

Mouse's First Fall

by Lauren Thompson; illustrated by Buket Erdogan

Simon & Schuster, 2006

For ages 2-4

Mouse and his mouse friend Minka enjoy a lovely fall day playing outside. They see the colorful leaves and examine the different shapes. Then they pile up the leaves and run and kick and swish through them. Then they pile them up again and jump! After this, Mouse and Minka play hide and seek. There are so many things to do with fallen leaves!

This simple but sweet book will inspire kids of all ages to play outside and enjoy the fall weather!

Minerva Louise at the Fair

by Janet Morgan Stoeke

Dutton Children's Books, 2000

For ages 3-5

The fair is in town, but the farm's curious hen Minerva Louise is the last to know. When she awakens to a big BOOM, she decides she must investigate! She sees fireworks but she thinks they must be stars falling from the sky. She follows the excitement to the fairgrounds, where she sees a Ferris wheel. Having never been to the fair before, she assumes it is a rather strange farm and is sure that the Ferris wheel is really a fancy bulldozer with stars on it. And when she sees the merry-go-round, she thinks it is a barn full of pretty horses!

If readers enjoy Minerva's trip to the fair, she has other book adventures to explore.

We Gather Together: Celebrating the Harvest Season

by Wendy Pfeffer; illustrated by Linda Bleck

Dutton Children's Books, 2006

For ages 6-10

This is an interesting look at the season of fall. It explains in simple terms why summer ends and autumn begins. Readers will learn that before we had refrigeration, people had to live on what they saved during the fall. A brief outline of farming is also given, starting in what is now Syria and Turkey about 10,000 years ago, and there are descriptions of harvest celebrations throughout the world, including our own Thanksgiving holiday.

At the end of the book, the author includes a list of equinox facts. Kids will enjoy working through the list of activities, including mini experiments to see if the sun really rises in the east and how the tilt of the Earth creates the seasons. Book and website resources are also given for those interested in further research.

Fletcher and the Falling Leaves

by Julia Rawlinson; illustrated by Tiphanie Beeke

Greenwillow Books, 2006

For ages 4-8

Fletcher the fox is worried. His favorite tree is changing from a vibrant color to a dull brown. Plus all the pretty leaves are falling! His mother assures him that the tree is fine, but Fletcher still wants to help. Fletcher makes many attempts to save the leaves and get them attached back to the tree, but the strong wind doesn't allow Fletcher's repairs to work for long.

What will happen with the fallen leaves and will Fletcher's tree be all right after the first frost?

Pastel illustrations in beautiful fall colors bring Fletcher to life and will make readers want to cuddle together in the cool air. This is a sweet book that teaches readers the importance of loving and respecting our surroundings.

Looking for comments?

We welcome your comments on this story, but please be civil. Do not use profanity, hate speech, threats, personal abuse or any device to draw undue attention. Our policy requires those wishing to post here to use their real identity.

Our commenting policy | Facebook commenting FAQ | Why Facebook?