Tarrant has more boys than girls but more women than men, census finds

Posted Friday, Aug. 19, 2011  comments  Print Reprints
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Changes since 2000

Tarrant County's fastest-growing age groups are in older demographics.

Age

2000

2010

increase

Males

62-64

11,910

21,985

85%

85 and over

3,345

6,044

81%

60-61

9,180

16,298

78%

Females

60-61

9,673

17,912

85%

62-64

13,209

23,935

81%

55-59

31,112

51,539

66%

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Good news for guys: Tarrant County women rule, according to new census stats.

Bad news: That's because males are dying more quickly.

Odds and ends of census data will trickle out for years. But here's a trend culled from the latest release of data last week: From birth to age 20, there are more males than females -- 11,200 more -- in Tarrant County. From 21 up, the trend reverses and there are more women.

The reason? Steve Murdock, a demographer at Rice University, said that for every 100 girls born, 105 boys are born.

But males die at a faster rate than females of the same age, from the fetal state until the late 20s.

Men are "kind of innately inferior," Murdock said. "In every culture always since we've measured this, males have died at a faster rate."

Murdock said the presence in Tarrant County of various colleges, such as UT Arlington, Texas Christian University and Texas Wesleyan, may help explain why women overtake men in the early-20s age group. Women are more likely to go to college than men, and women may be coming from outside the county to attend.

At TCU, 46 percent of students are male and 54 percent female.

Good times, gentlemen?

"Yeah, I'd say so," said Will Hardy, 20.

Sorry, ladies, but Hardy isn't looking for a girlfriend because he doesn't have time for a "commitment" as he studies accounting and pre-med.

John Hughes, a 28-year-old student from Long Island, said the women at TCU are just too young.

"They're a little immature," said Hughes, who served three tours in Iraq. "I'm like wine -- better with age."

The census counts college students where they live most of the year. If they live in dorms, they're counted among group quarter counts. If they live off campus, they are counted at that address.

Women also live longer than men, so the gap between men and women widens in the oldest age groups.

But men are starting to narrow the age gap in the oldest category. The census reports ages in groups, with 85 years and older at the top. In 2000, Tarrant had 3,345 men 85 or older, compared with nearly three times as many women: 9,631.

In 2010, Tarrant had 6,044 men who had celebrated their 85th birthday, compared with twice as many women, 13,423.Overall, women outnumber men here by almost 35,000. About 922,000 of the county's 1.81 million residents are women, 51 percent.

Darren Barbee, 817-390-7126

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